Sunday, April 20, 2014

Extra Credit DNA Blog

TAG of the Week:

This is an extra credit blog post.

1. Are there other genomic topics (i.e. diseases, treatment, screening ... etc) that you'd like to have learned?

2. Share what are some major take-home messages you've learned, and would like to share with others?

Thank you for your feedback, and I hope you will continue enjoying learning about genomics beyond this semester.

=) Prof. Chan

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Healthy Bugs DNA

TAG of the Week:

We have learned the impact of the human genome, epigenome and environment. 
One more genome resides inside of us - the microbiome. 

Listen to the NPR clip or read the NPR newsletter. 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/11/08/243929866/can-we-eat-our-way-to-a-healthier-microbiome-its-complicated

Discuss ways doctors and consumers could consider prescribing ways to eat our way to a healthy lifestyle (i.e. use examples about our readings on nutrigenomics, microbiome, epigenetics, fitness, behavioral ... etc). 

Or Please choose one of the following and comment:
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.

Sunday, April 6, 2014

My sporty genes

TAG of the Week:

Here it is:

Please read this New York Times Article, “Is Fitness All in the Genes?”


With everything that you have learned so far, do you believe fitness is purely based on one’s genome or is it a combined interaction of genetics and environmental factors (i.e. diet, workout routines, etc…)? Also, please comment on the potential limitations of the study outlined in this article. 

Or
Choose one of the following and comment:
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

It's 'genetic' (or not)

TAG of the Week:


Review the two research articles examining disease and well-being
1) the association between genetic variation and obesity
2) the association between genetic variation and pair-bonding behaviors

Please choose one of the following and comment:
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Prevention Obestiy 911

TAG of the Week:

Obesity is now a  public health emergeny.

Read this week's reading on obesity, life-course perspective, and these two news link.
In your comment: briefly propose an intervention using the life-course theory to decrease obesity. 

Comments on this

Obesity Is Found to Gain Its Hold in Earliest Years


Can Mom's Pregnancy Diet Rewire Baby's Brain For Obesity?



Saturday, March 1, 2014

Our Family History

TAG of the Week:


Read this piece by the American Cancer Society entitled “Genetic Testing for Cancer: What You Need to Know”.


Given the increased awareness of genetic components/factors that predispose or cause diseases and/or conditions, do you believe it is imperative to know your family’s genetic history? Also, should public (i.e. Medicaid and/or Medicare) or private insurers provide genetic testing and counseling to their customers? Finally, if you had the opportunity, free of charge, would you participate in genetic testing and subsequent counseling?

OR


1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.

Monday, February 24, 2014

ELSI in NBS

TAG of the Week:

Imagine this scenario: 

"The Government has my Baby's DNA! " cried a new mother who just found out her baby's blood has been sampled so the baby can be tested for a series of life-threatening diseases. While she is thankful that her baby has been tested negative, she is still upset that her baby's DNA remains in the hands of the government … Is that really true? If so, what's the big deal ? 

In the past few years, newborn screening programs across the world have taken some heat from the public. While the program was originally initiated to protect and to serve families, many advocates have taken a new twist to the population-based screening. General public miscommunication and misinterpretation of the original purpose of newborn screening could possibly shut down one of the most life-saving  and cost-effective programs for public health. 

Read this link, and compare your thoughts about the Scotland's situation with other countires (such as the US, UK, Asia … etc).  Incorporate what you've learned this week's lessons  and discuss the 'ethical, legal, and social issues' (ELSI) that have or have not been considered in this current news on newborn screening (NBS).  What would be your recommendations?

http://www.phgfoundation.org/news/15345/

OR1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification, 3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion.  4. Reply to another student's comment.


Saturday, February 15, 2014

Gene-Environment

TAG of the Week:


Here are the link and questions that follow, for the blog next week- 

Read this new article titled "USC Scientists Show Gene-Environment Interaction Augments Risk for Developing Autism"

After reading "Challenges and opportunities in genome-wide environmental
interaction (GWEI) studies" by Hugues et al and the news article above, briefly describe some of the strengths and limitations and future applications of Gene-Environment Interaction Studies.

OR
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification, 
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion.  
4. Reply to another student's comment.


Sunday, February 9, 2014

GWAS

TAG of the Week:

After reading "How to Use an Article About Genetic Association C: What Are the Results and Will They Help Me
in Caring for My Patients?" by Attia et al. and "The Positives, Protocols, and Perils of Genome-Wide Association" by Purcell and Neale, briefly describe the strengths, limitations, and future applications of Genetic Association studies?

Choose one of the four following activities and share your response in the "Comment Section below":
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment. 

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

New Treatment Options?

CUTAG of the Week: New Treatment Options?

Read this news link titled "Gene Therapy Shows Promise in Controlling HIV"

http://www.aidsmeds.com/articles/Sangamo_genetics_1667_24579.shtml

Based on this week's discussion on HIV, genetics, treatment, and, the news article above, do you think gene therapy has a promising future as a treatment for HIV/AIDS? Describe the strengths and limitations of your argument.    


OR choose one of the four following activities and share your response in the "Comment Section below":
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

TAG of the Week:

Welcome to HS320 Genomics in Public Health Spring Semester 2014.

The impact of epigenetic factors on health and disease is increasingly becoming more evident than previously expected (in the Pre-Human Genome Project era). Watch the short video clip on the "The Ghost in your Genes".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toRIkRa1fYU

Based on the class discussion, readings, lecture, and video, briefly share a new insight you learned this week. You can discuss about epigenetics, breast cancer, and/or any other new information. 

Choose one of the four following activities and share your response in the "Comment Section below"
1. You can share the new, 'surprising' information you learned
2. Ask a question that needs additional clarification,
3. Share a news link relevant to the discussion on epigenetics. 
4. Reply to another student's comment.


Sunday, December 1, 2013

Animal Genome

CUTAG of the Week:


Many studies focusing on human disease have employed use non-human primate (NHP) or mamalian animal subjects, such as Rhesus monkeys and mice, respectively.  Other organisms, however, have genes comparable to those of people and the utility of their genomes being mapped for similar studies can be unfortunatey overlooked.  By observing zebrafish, genetic information crucial to the underlying mechanism of Native American myopathy has been gained.  What major limitations do the original researchers account for (original article citation is included at the bottom)?  Are their conclusions fairly and accurately summarized by Science Daily?


Sunday, November 24, 2013

Better Drugs

CUTAG of the Week:


The p53 protein has been long-established as a tumor supressor protein and pharmaceuticals continue to accommodate its role in cancer in many of their drugs.  How do you think the present study’s findings will most likely affect future drug development?  What strategies would you choose to pursue as the most effective in addressing the p21/PUMA ratio discussed?

Sunday, November 17, 2013

It's all about Organic

CUTAG of the Week:



In the recent decade we have seen a movement toward organic, antibiotic-free, and non-GMO (among other qualities) products.  Do you assent with much of the biotechnology industry, which claims altering organisms for mass production is no more harmful (and possibly better) than artificial selection and traditional agricultural methods?  What type of studies would demonstrate the benefits of GMOs?  What are some potential consequences that GMO advocates need to account concerning introducing new organisms into our environment?

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Direct to Consumer

TAG of the Week:


Many private companies offer genetic testing directly to consumers (i.e., without the mediation of clinical staff, genetic counselors, or other professionals).  One of the major concerns public health practitioners, health professionals, and other stakeholders have with this is how those not fluent in genomics or medicine may manage their decisions based on the potential abundance of genetic risks communicated.  Do targeted services, such as personalized diets for weight loss, circumvent or compound this problem?  Does Inherent Health adequately explain their methods?  Would more information on the tests and/or genetic information reported to clients be more beneficial or harmful?